lgbtqblogs:

HollySiz, a French indie rocker better known as actress Cécile Cassel, recently released the music video for her single “The Light” off of her new album My Name Is. The heartbreaking-meets-heartwarming video depicts a couple with a young gender-nonconforming child they’re raising as a boy.

The child is teased in school for wearing a dress but appears nonetheless content to simply be himself. But when he comes home and plays with his My Little Pony toys, he’s reprimanded by his father and eventually forced to abandon his dress despite his mother’s support.

Behind the images, HollySiz’s lyrics urge the father and the listeners alike to accept the child, saying, “Let us grow / Let’s believe we can change / Let’s believe in ourselves.” Faced with his son’s devastation, the father must decide whether to heed social prescriptions or embrace his child.

the-fandoms-are-cool:

guns-n-cardigans:

ill-be-fine-love:

gayreyna:

things girls dont like about boys

  • "ew stop talking about tampons tmi"
  • *draws penis on literally everything*
  • "whoa chill out it’s just a joke"
  • "yeah it’s 8 inches"
  • "she looks like such a bitch"
  • "lmao im such a lesbian"
  • "if you like girls why dont you dress like one"
  • "Yeah childbirth hurts but have you ever been kicked in the balls"

"period cramps cant be that bad”

"Jesus. Are you on your period?

Gaaaaaay.”

rnusicality:

fun statistics for adults!
“when I was a kid, I had no help with college tuition, I was hardworking and paid it all myself”
-Annual tuition for Yale, 1970: $2,550
-Annual tuition for Yale, 2014: $45,800
-Minimum Wage, 1970: $1.45
-Minimum Wage, 2014: $7.25
-Daily hours at minimum wage needed to pay for tuition in 1970: 4.8
-Daily hours at minimum wage needed to pay for tuition in 2014: 17.3

  • Them: I don't think kids should be exposed to gay relationships.
  • You: Why not?
  • Them: It's introducing children to sexuality! They're too young for that!
  • You: So when a prince and princess kiss in a Disney movie, are they introduced to sexuality? When the prince and the princess get married and have a child, is that introducing your child to sexuality?
  • Them: NO! But if they see a man and a man, or a woman and a woman together... they're going to start asking questions! Like how a man and a man can... you know, do anything together.
  • You: You think the only thing people think when they see a gay couple is "I wonder how they have sex"? Furthermore, you think a CHILD is going to even know what that means? When the prince and the princess kiss, does your 4 year old daughter ask, "mommy, how do people have intercourse"? No. She just sees two people in love. If you remember when you were a kid, you probably didn't think about sex every time you saw two people happy together.
  • Them: But it'll bring up all kinds of questions, it'll confuse my child!
  • You: Then be a fucking parent and explain it to your child. The only question that might be brought up is "mom, why don't you want gay people to be happy?". And when you don't have a good answer for that question, you can look your child in the eye and say "It's because I'm a bigot".
tamorapierce:

taibhsearachd:

fatassvegan:

boo-author:

starklyinaccurate:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.
If you are healthy, please reblog.If you are sick, please reblog.If you have a disability, please reblog.If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.If you are a human being, please reblog.Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 
Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

And people ask me why I am afraid to use my cane in public.Being disabled, visibly so is always dangerous

When I got my first cane and posted about it, I had people demanding to know why I thought I “deserved” it at my age.
That was the word.
"Deserved".

This is the kind of bullshit that made my dad, a man who dealt with crippling pain from degenerative disc disorder, afraid to apply for handicapped parking
I remember saying to him that he could get handicapped plates and hearing him say that it wasn’t “bad enough” as I watched him wince and hobble as he walked from the back of the parking lot
People internalize these ideas, even handicapped people, that’s why this is so fucking important

I use a cane when I’m outside because of fatigue and balance issues. It helps me stay on my feet longer and not fall over. I get dirty looks and rude stares literally every time I’m around strangers, because I’m not (usually) visually limping, because I’m not putting my weight on it 100% of the time, because I’m too young to look like I need it. Because obviously my cheap-ass not-pretty-at-all cane is a fashion statement, or a ploy for attention, or something. People are terrible.

I was flying recently with a friend, and we had all kinds of fun traveling.  We had been on the tarmac a while and were told we’d been on it another while when she checked her blood sugar and realized it was going down fast.  (She had thought she would be good until beverage service, not realizing we would be bumped to #7 in the takeoff queue twice.)  She asked the hostess for a drink, explaining her reasons, and the hostess, being a very nice person, brought her a snack box as well.  A little later my friend heard the women in the seat across from us to the rear tell each other she had just “pretended” to be diabetic to get the snack box that she hadn’t even asked for.  I wanted to punch them.

tamorapierce:

taibhsearachd:

fatassvegan:

boo-author:

starklyinaccurate:

crohns-sucks:

neecygrace:

Today’s picture for invisible illness is a personal one. This is one of about 30 notes that my friend has received since using her handicapped placard. I’m going to say this to you, have you ever seen someone get out of a car parked in a handicapped space and said to yourself “they look too young or they don’t look disabled.” I’m going to go with yes you have, because we all have at one time. I can’t remember doing it, but before I understood the difficulties of invisible illness when I was younger I probably did. Let me ask you this though, when you had that thought was it because you knew with 100% certainty that they weren’t handicapped or did you assume that because of their age and/or not seeing a cane, walker or wheelchair? All I’m asking is that we stop and think when we someone need a mobility aid, park in a handicapped space or say they are disabled that we remember this “DISABILITY HAS NOTHING TO DO WITH AGE OR APPEARNACE.” #spoonie #invisibleillness #disability #chronicillness #rheumatoidarthritis #lupus #fibromyalgia #myofascialpainsyndrome

If nothing else, this post needs to be seen around the internet more. This harassment is not okay and no one should have to deal with it on top of having an invisible illness. This is just another form of anonymous bullying to add to the internet bullying these TROLLS are capable of.

If you are healthy, please reblog.
If you are sick, please reblog.
If you have a disability, please reblog.
If you have an invisible illness, please reblog.
If you know someone with a disability, please reblog.
If you are a human being, please reblog.

Let’s spread the word and help those of us that may not look like it. 

Ignorance isn’t bliss, ignorance is ignorance. 

And people ask me why I am afraid to use my cane in public.

Being disabled, visibly so is always dangerous

When I got my first cane and posted about it, I had people demanding to know why I thought I “deserved” it at my age.

That was the word.

"Deserved".

This is the kind of bullshit that made my dad, a man who dealt with crippling pain from degenerative disc disorder, afraid to apply for handicapped parking

I remember saying to him that he could get handicapped plates and hearing him say that it wasn’t “bad enough” as I watched him wince and hobble as he walked from the back of the parking lot

People internalize these ideas, even handicapped people, that’s why this is so fucking important

I use a cane when I’m outside because of fatigue and balance issues. It helps me stay on my feet longer and not fall over. I get dirty looks and rude stares literally every time I’m around strangers, because I’m not (usually) visually limping, because I’m not putting my weight on it 100% of the time, because I’m too young to look like I need it. Because obviously my cheap-ass not-pretty-at-all cane is a fashion statement, or a ploy for attention, or something. People are terrible.

I was flying recently with a friend, and we had all kinds of fun traveling.  We had been on the tarmac a while and were told we’d been on it another while when she checked her blood sugar and realized it was going down fast.  (She had thought she would be good until beverage service, not realizing we would be bumped to #7 in the takeoff queue twice.)  She asked the hostess for a drink, explaining her reasons, and the hostess, being a very nice person, brought her a snack box as well.  A little later my friend heard the women in the seat across from us to the rear tell each other she had just “pretended” to be diabetic to get the snack box that she hadn’t even asked for.  I wanted to punch them.

Reblogged from cas-cannot-twerk